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I'm interested in knowing the density of the latex layer of Ikea's Myrbacka and Morgongava latex mattress. Both of them are described as "medium-firm" by Ikea.

Based on the weight and the Queen size dimension provided by Ikea, I have estimated the density of the latex is about 3.6 to 3.8 Lb/Cu ft. This is equivalent to 65kg/m3 and belongs to the lowest density range and the very soft ILD range. I tried them in the Ikea strore and the feel for Morgongava was definitely softer than Myrbacka,

Can any one explain to me how could Ikea possibly rate them as medium firm latex? Do anyone have any info about the ikea latex specs including the ILD and density? I'm interested in getting Myrbacka but have concerned about its support and durability given its low ILD/density.

asked Dec 29 '16
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Bernie from Richmond, BC
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Thanks for the prompt reply. There is indeed more info from Ikea. There is a mattress buying guide here: www.ikea.com/ms/en_CA/pdf/buying_guides/Mattress_buying_guide_FY16.pdf

In there, it says the latex layer of Myrbacka is 16cm and the 2.2lb/c.ft polyfoam is 8cm (a total of 24cm) and the queen size weighs 88lb (from ikea web site). With this, I deduced the density is only 3.6 - 3.8 lb/cu ft.

Similarly, I estimated Morgongava to be similar in density but the feel is even softer. I guess it might have to do with the base polyfoam or because Myrbacka is synthetic?!

My concern is with that low density, will it last and will it be able to provide good spine support. I personally like the feel of latex than memory firm and think latex properly give better spine support than memory foam. But the Myrbacka memory foam version is rated firm and indeed feel much firmer. With brief trial in the store, I really can't tell which is better. If the latex version though feel soft could give a more durable spine support in the long run, I'd rather go with it rather than the initial firm feel of the memory foam version.

Any comments and insight in how this low density latex will do in the long run? Thanks !

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answered Dec 29 '16
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Bernie from Richmond, BC
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Thanks Bernie! That's great information!

I calculate about 19.5 cubic feet of latex in the queen-size Morgangava, based on an 18cm layer. The weight provided is for the full package (including the parts of the mattress that are not latex, like filling and the cover, as well as the packaging itself) is 103.5 lbs. If you assume somewhere between 10 and 25 lbs for the cover, filling, and the packaging, that leaves you with about 80-90 lbs of latex. This would be a latex density of about 4-4.5 lbs / cu ft.

The Myrbacka has about 17.3 cubic feet of latex in the queen-size, based on a 16cm layer. In this case, you've also got ~3" of poly foam (~8-9 cubic feet). Not sure where you got 2.2 lb density for that layer (which seems a bit higher than I would expect for a mattress at this price point), but if we go with that, this would be about 18+ lbs. With a full package weight of 91.5 lbs, you then need to back out the cover, filling, and packaging (assume between 10 and 25 lbs again), leaving you with 50-60 lbs for the latex. This would be a latex density of 3-3.5 lbs / cu ft.

I hope that helps!!

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answered Dec 29 '16
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edited Dec 29 '16

I did it with the wrong thickness for Morgongava; that's why the density is much lower. Thanks for correcting me.

As for the Myrbacka, the web site does say this:

Ticking/ Ticking: 64 % polyester, 36 % cotton Ticking, side: 64 % cotton, 36 % polyester Protective fabric/ Lining/ Part 3: Non-woven polypropylene Comfort material: Polyester wadding, Synthetic latex, High-resilience polyurethane foam (cold foam) 2.2 lb/cu.ft., 100 % lamb's wool Part 04: Polyester wadding Inner fabric: Non-woven polypropylene, Non-woven polypropylene Ticking: 100 % polyester

This is where I get the 2.2lb/cu ft Poly. But is that High-resilience? I doubt it; it could be at most high density, correct?

How come Morgongava feels much softer than Myrbacka even it is so much denser?

Do you have a ILD vs Latex density chart?

Now that the Myrbacka latex is only at 3 - 3.5 lb/cu ft, what would you think about its capability to support the spine and its durability? Would you think the Myrbacka memory foam (firm) version will give better spine support and durability?

Any idea about the gas given off by synthetic latex of Myrbacka? Some one complained it smells quite bad and could be toxic. Is that a real concern with synthetic latex?

Your opinions will be very much appreciated.

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answered Dec 29 '16
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Bernie from Richmond, BC
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Hi Bernie -- Thanks for your question.

I don't think IKEA provides sufficient information about their mattresses to be able to calculate things like latex densities. From their website, it looks like these mattresses contain quilting, a layer of latex, and a layer of base support foam -- however, it doesn't seem that they reveal the thicknesses of any of these layers. In particular, without knowing a precise number for how thick the latex layer is, any sort of guesstimating would be pretty futile. Similarly, they don't disclose the density of the thickest layer (the base support foam layer), which will also have a material impact on the math here.

Were you able to obtain any additional information from them beyond what is on their website?

Also, just to clarify, you are right that with latex, density and softness are highly correlated. However, there are a lot of other factors beyond the density / softness of the latex that will factor into how firm or soft this mattress feels overall. The most obvious that comes to mind is how much latex there is and how firm the stuff underneath the latex is. With any IKEA mattress, I would expect that a large portion of what you are feeling is actually the base foam layer below the latex. And since this base foam layer is poly foam, its density could not be deduced or inferred from its softness.

Net, without (a lot) more information from IKEA, I don't think it's possible to come up with even an approximate ballpark for the densities of their latex.

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answered Dec 29 '16
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edited Dec 29 '16

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